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Tara Institute

Tara Institute is named after the female Buddha, Tara, who represents the enlightened and liberating activities of all the Buddhas.  Tara was born from the tears of compassion of Avalokiteshvara, the Great Compassionate One, and puts Avalokiteshvara’s wishes into practice, caring for each and every sentient being as a mother would her precious child.

Tara Institute is one of approximately 150 centres and study groups affiliated with the Foundation for the Preservation of the Mahayana Tradition (FPMT), a worldwide network of Buddhist Centres.

Tara Institute has a large membership base that supports the Centre and its activities, as well as a floating population of about 400 who visit the centre on a weekly basis.

The main function of Tara Institute is to provide Buddhist teachings, to offer charitable service to the greater community and to support the members.

Tara Institute relies heavily on our volunteers to keep the Centre running; please see this article if you think you can help.

 

Transcript

Lama Zopa Rinpoche's talk given at Tara Institute in November 2014

 

Introduction to Buddhist Meditation

Philosophical tools to help you deal with everyday challenges - suitable for beginners and older students alike

Mondays ~ 8pm to 9pm
•5, 12, 19 & 26 January 2015

Everyone is welcome  - Please note there is no meal service in January and the office is closed until the 19th of January

Wednesdays in January 2015

8pm to 9pm - 7th, 14th, 21st & 28th January and 4th February

Everyone is welcome  - Please note there is no meal service in January and the office is closed until the 19th of January

Praise for Geshe Doga

as given by students at the Long Life Puja for Geshe Doga 2014

Donations 

practising generosity

Bequests

Dharma Quote

It is also necessary for us to be realistic about our approach in meditation. There are no quick results. We need to have a realistic approach where we allow ourselves time for transformation to take place; we need to be patient with our practice. There will be no results merely with a few attempts as it is not that easy to overcome a distracted mind.

Results won’t occur within a few days or few weeks or even few months, but if we engage in the meditation practice year after year, then we will begin to notice that some transformation definitely takes place. A steady transformation over a long period of time is sustainable and stable.

 

Ven. Geshe Doga 16-6-10